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Water meters

A water meter measures the exact amount of water that's supplied to a property.

Water meter inspections

Water meters are highly accurate, and the Region runs random sample accuracy tests.

If your water bill is higher than usual and you would like to have your meter inspected, please contact Water Billing to have a verification representative visit your home to check for leaks:

If you request the Region to check your water meter for accuracy, a service charge may apply.

Other water meter issues

If you have other meter issues, such as meter or coupling leaks, broken meter seals, a stopped meter or cut cables:

Other information

Most water meters are in the basement.

If you don’t have a basement, look for your water meter in a crawl space or on your main floor. The meter will be next to the main shutoff valve of your home.

If you can’t find your water meter, call 905-791-7800, ext. 3226.

Knowing how to read your water meter lets you monitor how much water is being supplied to your home. It also helps you discover leaks.

There are 3 types of residential water meters in Peel

Water meters in Peel measure volume in cubic metres. A cubic metre is the same as 1,000 L (220 gallons) of water.

1 black wheel

A water meter with 1 black wheel on black background in the odometer measures the amount of water supplied to the nearest tenth of a cubic metre.

Every complete rotation of the sweep hand represents 0.1 cubic metre or 100 L of water supplied. When the sweep hand moves from 0.01 to 0.02 it equals 10 L.

2 black wheels

A water meter with 2 black wheels in the odometer measures the amount of water supplied to the nearest hundredth of a cubic metre.

Every complete rotation of the sweep hand represents 0.01 cubic metre or 10 L of water supplied. When the sweep hand moves from 0.001 to 0.002 it equals 1 L.

3 black wheels

A water meter with 3 black wheels in the odometer measures the amount of water supplied to the nearest thousandth of a cubic metre.

Every complete rotation of the sweep hand represents 0.001 cubic metre or 1 L of water supplied. When the sweep hand moves from 1 to 2 it equals one tenth of a litre.

The ongoing maintenance of the Region’s water meter system includes replacing meters that are 20 years or older. At this time, the Region has temporarily suspended meter replacements due to COVID-19.

If you have questions or concerns, please call 905-791-7800, ext. 3226.

Replacing frozen or damaged meters

If your water meter is damaged or frozen because you didn’t take proper care of it, you will have to pay for the replacement meter.

For example, if it froze because you didn't provide enough heating, or didn't protect the meter from damage during a home renovation, you would be billed for your new meter.

The cost of a new meter depends on its size and how long the meter was in service.

If your water meter is damaged, do not buy a new meter from a retail provider. The Region supplies only one type of meter. We save money by buying large volumes of meters, so a new meter from the Region will cost you less.

Upgrading to a larger meter

You can ask for a larger meter for your home or business depending on your situation.

The biggest meter you can get is based on the inside diameter of the water pipe that enters your home or business.

You will be charged to upgrade to a larger meter. The cost of a larger meter depends on its size.

Repairing your shutoff valve

Homeowners are responsible for repairing or replacing their own shutoff valves or valves that won’t shut off water.

If your shutoff valve is broken, email Public Works customer service or call 905-791-7800 to book a water shutoff appointment.

The Region must shut off the main water supply to your home before the valve can be repaired. A plumber or other professional can fix the valve only while the water supply is shut off.

The Region of Peel conducts a rigorous testing program that follows standards and guidelines set out by the American Water Works Association. This program is continuous and ensures that the Region’s water meters are operating within industry best practices and standards. The program uses a combination of infield and laboratory testing depending on the age, size and type of individual water meters.